Health care workers in US start receiving COVID-19 vaccines

Health care workers in US start receiving COVID-19 vaccines
Health care workers in US start receiving COVID-19 vaccines

Just after 9AM on Monday, Sandra Lindsay, a critical care nurse in Queens, New York, was vaccinated against COVID-19. Lindsay was one of the first people in the United States to get a dose of the newly authorized Pfizer and BioNTech vaccine and was the first to get the shot in New York, an early epicenter of the pandemic.

“I hope this marks the beginning of the end of a painful time in our history,” she said.

Breaking: A critical care nurse in Queens, Sandra Lindsay, is the first New Yorker to be vaccinated in a non-trial capacity after the first doses of Pfizer’s vial arrived at Northwell Health this morning. “It didn’t feel any different from taking any other vaccine,” Lindsay said. pic.twitter.com/KSaYEQUTHE

— Spectrum News NY1 (@NY1) December 14, 2020

Lindsay was vaccinated just two days after the Food and Drug Administration issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) for the Pfizer and BioNTech product. The announcement marked the end of a record-breaking push to develop a vaccine against the deadly disease and the start of an unprecedented campaign to vaccinate millions of people in the US.

As soon as the authorization was handed down, Pfizer’s factory started preparing doses for shipment. Trucks left the company’s Michigan facility on Sunday, headed for the airport.

Breaking – UPS and FedEx trucks carrying the first U.S. shipment of coronavirus vaccine have left Pfizer’s facility near Kalamazoo, Michigan. pic.twitter.com/Cf32ki9gCF

— Pete Muntean (@petemuntean) December 13, 2020

Shipments touched down all over the country this morning, and other health care workers joined Lindsay as the first group of vaccine recipients. Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center coordinated the first shots after a countdown of “three, two, one, vaccinate.” Staff at Hartford HealthCare in Connecticut got their first doses at an outdoor tent, surrounded by cameras and reporters.

The first Ohioans have been vaccinated at @OSUWexMed. pic.twitter.com/aPCztnVTww

— Max Garrison (@m_p_garrison) December 14, 2020

And with that, the vaccination has begun.

Hartford HealthCare’s Dr. Ajay Kumar becomes the first person in Connecticut, and one of the first nationally, to receive the COVID-19 vaccine since its authorization. pic.twitter.com/DesXwqWlBN

— Alex Putterman (@AlexPutterman) December 14, 2020

Other hospitals will take a few more days to begin vaccinations. Boston Medical Center plans to start Tuesday or Wednesday, for example. Some doctors said on Twitter that they still haven’t gotten information about when their shots will be scheduled.

The FDA is expected to authorize the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at the end of this week, and if it does, shipments of that product will start to roll out across the country as well.

Operation Warp Speed, the federal partnership behind vaccine development, said that 20 million people could be vaccinated against COVID-19 by the end of the year. Some hospitals say that seems unrealistic because of the logistical challenges of coordinating shots and shifting expectations around the number of doses they’ll receive.

Despite all efforts to accelerate the distribution of the vaccine, COVID-19 cases are still surging around the country. It’ll be a few months before the vaccine is able to slow down the spread of death and disease. Still, the first injections are a scientific triumph — and for many people in the US, they are a bright sign of hope at the end of a long, dark year.

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